How to Make Lavender Body Oil

Lavender Body Oil is a relaxing elixir that’s simple to make. Growing Lavender is easy and offers many positive rewards. The lavender plant offers beauty, height, color, and an intoxicating aroma that is aesthetically pleasing in any garden. The vibrant purple lavender flowers, better known as spikes and buds, may be used in various ways, from brightening a room with a natural outdoor fragrance to providing aromatherapy that relaxes the mind, body, and soul. The lavender plant is an annual botanical, therefore, you get beautiful repeating performance year after year. At Chesterhaven Beach Farm, harvesting lavender is part of our to-do list each year.

There are so many benefits to using Lavender Oil on the skin.

Lavender is known for its soothing, relaxing, and therapeutic properties. The benefits of lavender oil include soothing sore and achy muscles, relaxing irritated skin (like sunburns and minor burns), and providing moisture to dry cracked skin. The lavender fragrance provides a calming atmosphere to any room. The best time to use this oil is before bed, on you, your child, your life partner, or your pet to relax and prepare for a beautiful night of sleep. The best results come when your skin is moist, to begin with, as in right-out-of-the-shower-wet.

Baby sleeping after lavender body oil massage

It’s always best to set the intention to sleep before bedtime.

  • Turn off all electronics.
  • Take a nice bath or shower to wash the day away.
  • Prepare a nice cup of warm Good Night Tea with a dollop of Spring Honey.

Lavender is also a natural antiseptic and anti-inflammatory agent when used topically; research is ongoing into using lavender essential oil for pharmaceutical purposes.

new row of grosso X featuring yellow butterfly

The gift that keeps on giving

One of my favorite things to do is to make homemade products for my friends and family. Since lavender oil is so versatile, it is the perfect little gift. It is both thoughtful and easy to make on your own. I am often asked how to make lavender oil; below is a simple recipe to make lavender oil on your own! An essential thing to mention, if you have never made body oil before now, learn about safety in preparing infused oils first.

lavender body oil on slab of pink salt with other raw ingredients

To make Lavender Body Oil, You will need:

  • A sanitized and bone-dry quart-size glass jar (mason jar works)
  • Two sanitized and bone-dry 8-ounce glass jars for storage
  • Sanitized measuring cups
  • Measuring spoon
  • Cheesecloth or muslin
  • Funnel
  • Carrier oil of your choice
  • Dried lavender buds
  • 70% Alcohol
Lavender in bloom with monarch butterfly in pollinator garden

How to Make Lavender Body Oil

  • Thoroughly sanitize your work area with 70% isopropyl alcohol, including your work surface and all utensils you will be using for this project.
  • Lightly crush dried lavender buds with a mortar and pestle.
  • Sanitize a quart-size glass jar in a dishwasher or use a stove-top method. Make sure the jar is completely dry before use.
  • Fill a glass jar with dried and crushed lavender buds.
  • Add sunflower oil (or other carrier oil) and cover buds completely.
  • Pierce vitamin E capsules with fork tine or paring knife. Empty liquid contents of pills into the jar. Stir well with a stainless-steel spoon.
  • Top off the mixture with more carrier oil to prevent air from remaining in the jar, and seal with a lid.
  • Store in a warm dark location for 4 to 6 weeks, and gently shake your jar every day.
  • Note: If you prefer not to wait 4 to 6 weeks, you can heat the lavender bud and oil mixture in a double boiler to 100 to 120 degrees. Use a thermometer to make sure the temperature of the oil mixture does not go above 120 degrees. Excessive heat will make the oil unstable, and the shelf life will be limited.
  • Strain the oil by lining a funnel with muslin or cheesecloth; insert the funnel into the mouth of sanitized jars. Pour the oil mixture in and discard the buds. If using the “quick method,” wait for the mixture to cool before straining and storing.
old red truck with girls frolicking in field

The shelf life of this Lavender Oil is between 1-2 years provided:

  1. The carrier oil used typically has a long shelf life
  2. The carrier oil is fresh and has not been sitting on the shelf for several years
  3. Your work environment is clean
  4. Stay between 100-120 degrees when heating the oil, as instructed

If you decide to try making this recipe, share a snapshot with us using #waxingkararecipes on Instagram. We love seeing your photos!

If you don’t like DIY projects, that’s ok; we understand. Try our Lavender Baby Oil! Our Lavender Baby Oil is 90% organic and contains Bulgarian Lavender. The lavender oil comes with a booklet you can follow to give your baby (young or old) a loving massage with the oil.

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lavender recipes lavender body oil

Lavender Body Oil Recipe

Keyword: lavender body oil
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 days
Servings: 12
Lavender Body Oil Recipe is soothing and relaxing and makes a perfect gift!
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried lavender flowers (if using frozen, thaw and dry completely first)
  • 16 oz sunflower oil (you may also use sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, fractionated coconut oil, or any carrier oil you prefer)
  • 8 100 IU vitamin E capsules

Instructions

  • Lightly crush dried lavender buds with a mortar and pestle.
  • Sanitize a quart-size glass jar in a dishwasher or use a stove-top method. Make sure the jar is completely dry before use.
  • Fill a glass jar with dried and crushed lavender buds
  • Add sunflower oil (or other carrier oil) and cover buds completely.
  • Pierce vitamin E capsules with fork tine or paring knife and empty liquid contents of capsules into the jar. Stir well with a stainless-steel spoon.
  • Top off mixture with more carrier oil to prevent air from remaining in the jar and seal with a lid.
  • Store in a warm dark location for 4 to 6 weeks, and be sure to gently shake your jar every day.
  • Note: If you prefer not to wait 4 to 6 weeks, you can heat the lavender bud and oil mixture in a double boiler to 100 to 120 degrees. Excessive heat will make the oil unstable and the shelf life will be limited. Use a thermometer to make sure the temperature of the oil mixture does not go above 120 degrees.
  • To finish your lavender oil, first, strain it by lining a funnel with muslin or cheesecloth. Then insert the funnel into the mouth of your sanitized 8-ounce jars. Pour the oil mixture in and discard the buds. If using the “quick method,” wait for the mixture to cool before straining and storing.
  • Shelf life is between 1 and 2 years, depending on the carrier oil used.

13 thoughts on “How to Make Lavender Body Oil”

    • hmmm. Michelle, that’s odd. Sunflower oil is typically a very light oil. If you are uncomfortable using any formulation on your skin, don’t. I use body oil right out of the shower while my skin is still very wet, and I vigorously rub it into my skin. If you use any oil on dry skin, it’s not advisable. All you are doing, in essence, is sealing dry skin in. When you use conventional lotions made by a formulation, it’s usually part water and oil and butter. By applying oil to very wet skin you are delivering moisture to your skin while you are “sealing” in the moisture. I hope that this makes sense and I hope you’ll try this technique. Also if the oil feels heavy I would not use it on your face. It may not actually be sunflower oil if it feels heavy. Thanks for sending the feedback.

  1. Hi there quick question if I don’t have a double boiler is a normal stove plate ok only found your recipe now and need the oil for Sunday as a gift

    • Hey Nadine! The idea is you want to be gentle with the oil. If you overheat it, it will no longer do what you want it to do, it will thin out and could smell really bad (burnt). If you don’t have a double boiler, make one! if you have 2 pots, one that can fit in the other, fill the bottom pot with water and boil, and set the smaller pot in the boiled water to be one step away from the heating element. If you have a crockpot that you can set in low heat that will work also! The trick is not to overheat the oil. Good luck.

  2. Hi! Excited to make this because I can’t find my affordable lavender oil during Covid I used to get a TJ’s, and I have lots of lavender! However I need it right away as I’m out of my old oil. How long is the shelf life if heated?

    • Ksenia, as long as you make sure that you are working in a super-clean environment and wash everything down with 70% alcohol before you start and be sure not to cross-contaminate anything this oil if kept in a dark room temperature cabinet should last a year. It depends how old the oil is that you are using to make it, etc. but I would count on a year. Keep it in a clear jar so that you can notice any change in the appearance. That or a change in the way it smells are indications that it is time to throw it away.

  3. Hi! thank you so much for the wonderful recipe, I was wondering if the lavender buds could be left in the jar with the oil after the 4-6 weeks, and also do I need to put the vitamin e oil in or is that optional?

    • Hi Katelyn! You are more than welcome. I would not leave the buds in the jar after steeping them. First, they will likely turn a very ugly shade of brown. Next, there will be more of a chance of contamination and bacteria over time. Your safest bet is to follow the instructions and enjoy the oil. The vitamin e oil is an antioxidant and it will add to the life of the oil. It’s a good thing to do. If you choose not to do this, it isn’t the end of the world, it just may not last quite as long. Thanks for writing it’s great to hear from you!

  4. hi – what is the alcohol in the recipe to be used for? I want to be sure I’m making this correctly. thank you!

    • Hey Penelope! The alcohol is used to sanitize your work area. Always use 70% isopropyl alcohol. Sanitize your work surface and any and all utensils you will be using for this project. Enjoy!

  5. You can use any oil that you prefer. You really cannot mess this up if it’s to your own taste and made in small batches. The only thing to think about is shelf life of oils. Some of the more interesting and exotic oils have a short shelflife.

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